Natural Element Photography Artists

Natural Element Photography Artists

The painting “Spring Polar Night” was acquired by Pavel Tretyakov for the gallery directly from the exhibition, and along with it – about 60 more paintings and sketches by Alexander Borisov, inspired by travels across Novaya Zemlya. The paintings were really unique: the artists had painted the winter before, but before Borisov none of the artists had gone so far north with sketchbooks. In travel notes, the pioneering artist describes the difficulties he had to face on the journey. And he named the book of memoirs appropriately – “In the land of cold and death.” Nevertheless, Borisov was so enchanted by the north that he did not write anything else. He immortalized landscapes on canvases, and his contemporaries, painters, on a map. Tretyakov glacier, Kuindzhi and Shishkin capes, Kramskoy and Vasnetsov , Vereshchagin and Repin appeared on the map of Novaya Zemlya after the expeditions of Alexander Borisov.

Tundra

On the canvases of Alexander Borisov – endless snowy plains and meager sun rays. Despite freezing fingers, paints thickening from frost and breaking brushes, the artist spent long hours behind the canvas to convey the insinuating beauty of local landscapes and subtle nuances of light. The lowest temperature at which the painter had a chance to paint is minus 39 ° C.

Forest tundra

He painted his first works on the Volga, in which one could feel the influence of the landscape masters Ivan Shishkin and Isaac Levitan . It was during his travels around the Arkhangelsk province that Perepletchikov found the main themes of his paintings and acquired his original style. For 12 years, the artist went on long trips, as he himself said, “again to the Arctic Ocean, to big strong people.” Contemporaries followed with great interest Perepletchikov’s work.

Taiga

Apollinaria Vasnetsov is called the master of the epic landscape. In search of an unusual nature, the painter traveled a lot across Ukraine, Crimea , the Caucasus , Italy and Switzerland. But he was really captivated by the harsh nature of the Urals and Siberia. “An artist who paints by impression,” as Konstantin Korovin called Vasnetsov, created a collective epic image based on sketches. Nature in his paintings became more mysterious and majestic than in reality. The longer you look at the picture, the more the feeling becomes stronger that Ivan Tsarevich is about to appear from the taiga thicket on the Gray Wolf from the painting by Viktor Vasnetsov, the elder brother of Apollinarius Vasnetsov.

Forest

In reality, the landscape depicted in the painting did not exist. Andrei Shilder, like other representatives of the St. Petersburg camp of landscape painters, invented his paintings, and did not paint from nature. The artist kept whole albums with sketches of trees, and then arranged them for each new painting. Now “Birch Forest” is in the collection of the Stavropol Regional Museum of Fine Arts.

Forest-steppe

Mikhail Klodt is often called the master of the lyrical landscape. The artist visited Switzerland and France, but neither the foreign nature, nor the European school of painting interested him. The heyday of Mikhail Klodt’s creativity happened after returning to Russia, when he became interested in rural landscapes. The painting “Volga near Simbirsk” was written by the artist at the time when he left the Association of the Itinerants and went to travel around the country. Now the picture is in the collection of the Irkutsk Regional Art Museum. V.P. Sukacheva.

Steppe

In 1849, the aspiring artist Alexei Savrasov went to the South of Russia for inspiration. The endless expanses of the steppe and the high transparent sky amazed his imagination. When he returned, he painted a series of landscapes, and critics spoke of him as the hope of Russian art. One of the key works of this time was the painting “Steppe by day”, where the steppe appears as a space spreading to the horizon, filled with soft golden light. Now it is kept in the Russian Museum.

Semi-desert

Konstantin Bogaevsky devoted a lot of time to the study of history and even created a special genre of “archaeological”, or historical, landscape. Most often, in his paintings the image of ancient Cimmeria, embodied in the views of his native Feodosia, arose. The Genoese fortress in the artist’s paintings is not just a symbol of the city, but also an image connecting the ancient city of Kafa with Feodosia of the 20th century.

Desert

Nicholas Roerich is not just an artist, he is a philosopher and traveler. His landscapes are an amazing example of mystical realism, when completely familiar objects acquire a deep symbolic meaning. The artist writes the views of the desert during a scientific expedition, combining the work of a researcher with painting pictures and creating philosophical essays.

Subtropics

The artist Ivan Aivazovsky chose three leading themes for himself: the image of the sea, historical battles and Crimean landscapes. The Crimean nature attracted the artist with its changeability. Capturing its elusive shades is just as difficult as capturing the successive waves of the sea. In the painting “Evening in the Crimea. Yalta ”the artist managed to convey the glare of the setting sun. Resounding lilac-pink tones in the background pale in the shadow of the rocks. A few more minutes will pass, the sun will sink into the sea – and the color scheme will be transformed.

“… Aivazovsky, whoever says whatever, is a star of the first magnitude, in any case, and not only here, but in the history of art in general.”
Ivan Kramskoy

“In the same way, the historical landscape strives to become the historical portrait of the earth. The face of the earth is shaped geologically, just as the human face is anatomically, and in the same way it is defined by wrinkles, scars and wounds left on it by the elements and people: signs of moments. This is the meaning of the Historical Landscape. “
Maximilian Voloshin

“With Savrasov, lyric poetry appeared in landscape painting and boundless love for his native land … and this undoubted merit of his will never be forgotten in the field of Russian art.”
Isaac Levitan

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