Photography Artist Morozov Alexander History

Photography Artist Morozov Alexander History

Morozov Alexander


Alexander Morozov was born in 1974 in Lugansk. Graduated from the St. Petersburg State Academic Institute of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture named after V.I. IE Repin, and also studied under the program “Practical work. New Technologies in Contemporary Art ”at the PRO ARTE Institute.

Works in various genres of contemporary art: object, installation, graphics, video and painting. The circle of interests is art, which has outgrown its formal boundaries, becoming philosophy, anthropology, sociology and life itself. The artist pays great attention to the various mediums of artistic expression, studying their boundaries and interactions. The artist’s recent projects raise a number of complex philosophical questions related to expanding the model and functioning of the structure of art, fixing the experience and representation of the environment physically located outside the cultural field, but inside the field of cultural research, as well as studying the dichotomy of the concepts of “nature vs culture” outside the anthropological paradigm.

Alexander Morozov took part in the XI Krasnoyarsk Museum Biennale, the 3rd Ural Industrial Biennale, in special projects of the 6th Moscow Biennale of Contemporary Art, in the parallel and public program of Manifesto 10, the Baltic Biennale and many other exhibition projects in Russia and abroad.

Selected solo exhibitions:

2017

Bird Registration, Muhu AI R, Estonia

“Simple things”, Triumph Gallery, Moscow

“The masses”, Vladimir Smirnov and Konstantin Sorokin Foundation, Moscow, Russia

2016

“Polity”, CTI Fabrika, Moscow

“Lines of Place”, Center for Contemporary Art Zarya, Vladivostok

“Goodbye Moscow”, Museum of Contemporary Art. S. P. Diaghilev St. Petersburg State University

2015

“Cosa Mentale”, Marina Gisich Gallery, St. Petersburg

2014

“What do you see?”, Art re.Flex Gallery, St. Petersburg

“Garden”, Library of book graphics, St. Petersburg

2012

“Factum”, Luda express in New Holland, St. Petersburg

“Human Factor”, with Alexander Artyomov, Algallery, St. Petersburg

“Cinderella Effect”, Gallery Navikula Artis, St. Petersburg

2010

“Irradiation”, Gallery Navikula Artis, St. Petersburg

2009

“Classic Garden of German Romanticism”, Botanical Museum of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg

The artist’s works are in the collections of the State Russian Museum, the Kaliningrad State Art Gallery, the Krasnoyarsk Museum Center, the Library of Book Graphics in St. Petersburg, the Vladimir Smirnov and Konstantin Sorokin Foundation, and the Perm State Art Gallery.

The project “Garden of Romanticism” by Alexander Morozov, if viewed through the prism of Japanese aesthetics, at first glance represents a movement in the opposite direction – it is a natural appropriation of culture. But this is only at first glance. Copies of the German art magazines “Decorative Art” (Dekorative Kunst) and “Art for All” (Die Kunst für аlle), published exactly a century ago, in March 1914, and found by the artist on the books, included art reproductions of the works of Anselm von Feuerbach, Caspar David Friedrich, Francis Seymour Hayden, photographs of majolica, still lifes and other visual artifacts of the 19th century. The magazines that passed through the stream of time did not literally come out of it dry – mold formed on the damp pages. This organic element is the mycelium of the fungus, manifesting itself in the form of vague greenish-grayish or yellowish spots – it becomes a prism of time, a kind of natural optics, a natural framing of the artificial. Such a peculiar, natural ready-made becomes the main component of the “Garden of Romanticism” installation. The artist printed prints of reproductions, retouched with translucent paints with the addition of mushrooms. As a result, a certain conscious conceptual tautology is achieved – the life of reproduction is reproduced and it is given a chance to continue its existence, but already as an original (from which, however, the impression is still removed), retouched by nature. natural ready-made becomes the main component of the installation “Garden of Romanticism”. The artist printed prints of reproductions, retouched with translucent paints with the addition of mushrooms. As a result, a certain conscious conceptual tautology is achieved – the life of reproduction is reproduced and it is given a chance to continue its existence, but already as an original (from which, however, the impression is still removed), retouched by nature. natural ready-made becomes the main component of the installation “Garden of Romanticism”. The artist printed prints of reproductions, retouched with translucent paints with the addition of mushrooms. As a result, a certain conscious conceptual tautology is achieved – the life of reproduction is reproduced and it is given a chance to continue its existence, but already as an original (from which, however, the impression is still removed), retouched by nature.

But the sophisticated conceptual move is complemented by the presence of a strong organic element – the fungal ornament growing on the leaves largely sets the tone for the interpretation. Mushroom-like organisms are classified as lower plants that lack chlorophyll and feed heterotrophically, that is, at the expense of other living or dead organisms. Fungus in the book appears due to a number of “favorable” conditions, such as moisture and lack of sunlight. But the most important component is cellulose, the main constituent of the cell walls of all higher plants. Thus, fungal mold perceives the book not as a cultural object, but as a part of natural flora. The book becomes an ordinary woody structure, destroyed and absorbed by toxic fungal enzymes. The artist notices the destructive function of fungal mold and directs it in a creative direction. In doing so, he refers the viewer to the traditional practices of using molds such as fermentation, sourdough and fermentation, which are common elements of the art of culinary (cultivation of natural elements).

The artist’s project “Registration of Birds” – recording time, flights and drawings of the flight path of birds in the surrounding landscape – includes many contexts. Considering the drawings in the series as an index registration of bodily impulses, the artist confronts the unconscious with forms of scientific fixation. By creating drawings at the places of correctional camps and military bases, the artist also emphasizes the political undertones of his gesture. By rethinking the aspects of the interaction between environment and time, the artist shows physical space as the tip of an iceberg, woven from real and fictional coordinates. The mysterious landscape of the unconscious is only a conditional map of consciousness, movement along which is accidental and extremely dangerous. The artist emphasizes the equality of the phenomena of life and the conventionality of our ideas about the real.

At the exhibition “Simple Things” the artist “lifted” a simple office chair, appropriated to the Institute of Philosophy of the Russian Academy of Sciences, thereby personifying an ordinary object, giving it a sacred meaning.

In the project, the artist turns to the theme of everyday life, revealing hidden meanings in ordinary objects. A series of works performed in a rare and laborious technique (egg tempera on boards with chalk gesso) allows the artist to achieve a very deep effect, which, however, does not serve the purpose of depicting the world as it is, but rather to show its invisible side.

The unusual format of the boards is subordinate to the internal logic of each individual work and excludes the depicted object from the usual context, giving the viewer the opportunity to observe the object or its fragment by itself. On the other hand, comments composed by the artist himself, which are impromptu excursions into the history of art, literature, philosophy, set a strict direction of thought and serve as a guide for the viewer in the universe constructed by the artist.

In 2016, Alexander Morozov became a laureate of the “Factory Workshops. Session III ”, organized by the CTI“ Factory in cooperation with E.K.Artburo. At the exhibition held at the Fabrika CTI in October-November 2016, Alexander showed his work “Polity”, the curators of the project were Elena Kuprina-Lyakhovich and Sergey Troshchenkov.

In the project “Polity” Alexander Morozov explores the experience of building political formations, dealing with constructs that have overgrown with mythological ballast. On the other hand, he is interested in the very concept of an autonomous territory. He explores the political structures that emerged from the ruins of the Russian Empire at critical historical moments, both from an aesthetic and political point of view. Rather, presenting politics as an aesthetic category, trying to penetrate the future and warning against rewriting history.

“Polity” in the dictionary is defined as the rule of the majority and is used as generic for the concept of “independent community”. This concept often appears in discussions about the forms or typologies of political systems, especially when it is necessary to classify political systems in their entirety, and not specific institutions within a society. An attempt to present this integrity in the form of a sculpture and an archive was the subject of research. Alexander Morozov writes in a commentary – “The format of such a study itself does not imply a scientific analysis of all sources. Rather, I am trying to fluently capture the intonation of the language of power. As Andrei Platonov has an original “primitive and awkward language” that has no analogues in Russian literature, so in places where the imperial clutches are broken, sprouts and inflorescences of democracy appear in the form of communes and communities. ”

In the center of the Polity exposition there are eight sculptural objects made of a metal rod, each object – a “flag frame” is supplemented with materials on the history of the republics – the Ural, Far Eastern, Crimean People’s, Tatar, Siberian and Northern Ingria, etc. The installation is supplemented with material from personal and museum archives, including materials provided by the Yeltsin Center and tells the viewer about the history of the creation of temporary political formations and their culture. Most of the republics, the history of which the author refers to, broke out at the historical moment of the change of formations, at a time when the revolutionaries in art coincided with the transformants of life.

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